Fall 2017 Corps Review    |    Back

Cadet and alumni members of the regimental band stand on Worsham Field before performing during the Virginia Tech homecoming game, which also was Highty-Tighty Reunion weekend.

Cadet and alumni members of the regimental band stand on Worsham Field
Cadet and alumni members of the regimental band stand on Worsham Field before performing during the Virginia Tech homecoming game, which also was Highty-Tighty Reunion weekend.

Fall Is a Special Time for the Corps of Cadets
By Sandi Bliss, chief advancement officer

There have been so many highlights of my first fall semester in Blacksburg and at Virginia Tech. Seeing students return to campus. Enjoying my first season of Hokie football. And unforgettably — for someone who spent the previous couple of years in south Florida — watching the leaves change to match the orange and maroon of Virginia Tech. It’s simply wonderful to walk across our beautiful campus and see the cadets back and to enjoy all the activities that go along with the Corps Reunion, Highty-Tighty Reunion, and Virginia Tech homecoming.  

Of all this fall’s special moments, one that I will cherish is standing among cadets at Lane Stadium and watching the Highty-Tighties play the national anthem as a giant American flag was proudly displayed. What a sight to behold, as our colors lightly blew in the Blacksburg breeze with the sounds of our national anthem in the background.

To add to this wonderful experience, I was able to attend the Corps Donor Breakfast that same weekend. While I truly enjoyed watching cadets interact with their donors, I was troubled to learn that some of our scholarship recipients never get a chance to attend this inspiring event. One of my efforts moving forward will be to ensure that all cadets with a Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets scholarship get an opportunity to attend the breakfast at least once by their senior year.  

This event not only gives cadets a chance to interact with donors who have invested in their futures, it fosters a deeper level of appreciation for what it means when donors pay it forward. The experience of meeting face-to-face with our donors never fails to inspire our cadets — or me, for that matter. I would like to offer my sincere thank you and appreciation for each and every one of you who have invested in the Corps’ future.   

 

A Tribute to Stan Cohen ’49
By Scott Lyman ’84, associate director of development

I have been to many places in this world, but the fall in Blacksburg is breathtaking. The colors are so vibrant, ablaze with orange and maroon, that it truly sets this campus apart. Even my son, a graduate of the University of Alabama, said our campus, especially in the fall, outshines his. Do not forget football, when Lane Stadium is packed with 65,000 fans stomping to Enter Sandman by Metallica. You can hear it from the Upper Quad.

During my time as an associate director of development here at Virginia Tech, I have had the opportunity to meet with some truly remarkable Corps alumni. Maj. Stan Cohen ’49 certainly was one of them. He served with distinction in World War II as a fighter pilot. Unfortunately, Stan passed away last year, but his legacy will live on through his son, Ron.

For the past eight or so years, Stan had coordinated and paid for the fuel so that aircraft from the Tri-State Warbird Museum in Bavatia, Ohio, would fly over Lane during our Corps Reunion games. I was at Stan’s funeral, and afterward I met with Ron for a few minutes. During that conversation, he indicated that he would like to continue his father’s legacy by covering the cost of fuel so that aircraft from the museum will continue to grace our skies on Corps Reunion weekends. It’s a moving way for Ron to continue his father’s legacy.

In another fitting tribute to Stan, the Warbirds’ C-45 Expeditor sports the nose art “Hokie Pokie.” Meanwhile, Stan’s lasting impact goes even further. His generosity enables us to provide four scholarships to financially needy cadets each year.

Three cadets were among College of Engineering students named the McAllister Leadership Scholars for the 2017-18 academic year. Pictured From left are, Riley Cooper ’17, Bill McAllister ’65, Maj. Gen. Randal Fullhart, Michael Sherborne ’17, and Chris Selig ’18. Since 1998, this scholarship has benefitted undergraduate engineering students who demonstrate superior intellectual promise and academic performance, leadership ability, and personal character.

Pictured From left are, Riley Cooper ’17, Bill McAllister ’65, Maj. Gen. Randal Fullhart, Michael Sherborne ’17, and Chris Selig ’18.
Three cadets were among College of Engineering students named the McAllister Leadership Scholars for the 2017-18 academic year. Pictured From left are, Riley Cooper ’17, Bill McAllister ’65, Maj. Gen. Randal Fullhart, Michael Sherborne ’17, and Chris Selig ’18. Since 1998, this scholarship has benefitted undergraduate engineering students who demonstrate superior intellectual promise and academic performance, leadership ability, and personal character.

Caldwell March Helps Show Cadets What’s Possible
By Kerry Meier VT’11, VT’15, development associate

The air usually gets a little crisper, and we find comfort in a cup of hot apple cider after the Hokies have beaten our opponents in Lane Stadium every fall. Each new autumn season brings the promise of another year, and the excitement of new cadets to campus. The new cadets will face many new experiences and challenges designed to push them to their limits. As the author John Green one asked: “What is the point of being alive if you don’t at least try to do something remarkable?”

One of the most remarkable things our first-year cadets accomplish is the Caldwell March. I was fortunate enough to help a mother surprise her son by sponsoring him in honor of his father and late grandfather — both veterans. Each and every parent should be proud of their new cadet’s accomplishments. The Class of 2021 completed 13 miles and came out smiling. All these cadets have done something they never thought they could before. Being able to provide all cadets with new experiences that help them to find their new limits and accomplish things they never before thought they could is why I love working for the Corps.

 

Annual Giving

By Devon Smith, assistant director of Annual Giving

It’s natural for autumn to be a Hokie’s favorite season. For the past 19 years, I’ve enjoyed the maroon and orange foliage, crisp fall air, booming of Skipper, and cheers emanating from Lane Stadium. My first visit was as the younger sister of a brother majoring in engineering. A few years later, I enrolled as a student in agricultural economics. After my graduation I continued to return as a fan, and now I’m enjoying the season for the first time as the assistant director of annual giving. My relationship with the university has changed like the leaves, but I know I’ve always had a home at Virginia Tech. Gifts from generous alumni like you and me help to ensure that this will continue to be home for generations of Hokies to come.

Below you will find some exciting happenings in Annual Giving.

  • Our online giving page is a secure website where you can choose from over 150 fund designations so that your gift enhances the programs that are most important to you. Visiting givingto.vt.edu/corps is a quick and easy way to make a gift.
  • You now have the option to make a recurring monthly gift. You select the denomination and designation, and your credit card will be charged on the 15th of each month. This option is available to those who give by phone at 800-533-1444 in response to the fall campaign we recently mailed or in response to the winter campaign launched shortly after Thanksgiving.
  • In February 2018, our Student Calling Center will invite cadets to participate in the annual Caldwell March Phoneathon. This is a special time cadets and alumni connect to share experiences — what’s happening in Blacksburg and what alumni have done since they’ve graduated. Each call ends with the opportunity to make your gift to the Corps.
  • Finally, on March 20, 2018, Virginia Tech will hold its first Giving Day. This will be an exciting, 24-hour period of fundraising campaigns and challenges for programs across the university. Be on the lookout for more information in the future regarding this new opportunity to show your Corps pride and make an impact.

 

Year-End Giving Tips
By Judith Davis, Office of Planned Giving

Now is the time to make your gift count for your Corps and for your 2017 taxes. Visit givingto.vt.edu/year-end for year-end giving guidelines and contact information.

If you are age 70 1/2 or older, consider using a charitable IRA rollover to make a gift that can count toward your required minimum distribution without it being taxed as income. Also called a qualified charitable distribution, or QCD for short, such gifts must be transferred directly from your IRA to qualified charities such as the Virginia Tech Foundation Inc.

Charitable IRA rollover gifts are limited to $100,000 per person, per year, and certain other restrictions apply. You are encouraged to learn more at givingto.vt.edu/ira-rollover and to consult your tax advisor before making your gift.

We’re here to help you find a gift that works for you and makes a difference for the Corps. Contact the Corps development office at 540-231-2892 or email srbliss@vt.edu.

Get Involved: Donate

Learn how you can make a gift today by calling the Corps Advancement Office at 540-231-2892.