Fall 2017 Corps Review    |    Back

While on a CULP Mission to Thailand, Cadet Liana Sinnott ‘18, at left, participated in physical fitness training alongside Thai cadets at the Chulachomklao Royal Military Academy.

Cadet Liana Sinnott ‘18, at left, trades a T-shirt with a cadet from Thailand.
While on a CULP Mission to Thailand, Cadet Liana Sinnott ‘18, at left, participated in physical fitness training alongside Thai cadets at the Chulachomklao Royal Military Academy.

Army ROTC cadets had an intense summer of training, participating in 220 training events. While 90 of our cadets attended Advance Camp, a commissioning requirement, others attended Basic Camp, Army schools (Airborne, Air Assault, Mountain Warfare), and international cultural immersion and language training activities. Additionally, 24 cadets conducted internships with active-duty units, medical departments, National Security Agency, NASA, and Advance Cyber Education.

Advance Camp
By Casey Soper ’18

Although I spent all my junior year preparing for camp and even had the upper-hand of going to Basic Camp the summer before, I still felt apprehensive about testing my knowledge of Army tactics and leadership capabilities in the field environment. I was fortunate to be placed in a platoon with amazing cadre as I spent the next four weeks being challenged and pushed far outside of my comfort zone. The biggest lesson I learned was that leadership is not solely dependent on how much you know, but rather how much you care for others. I enjoyed the field because the platoon was together every hour of the day, so it was easy to encourage others when they started to feel worn out, as well as learn from the choices that they made, both good and bad. In the end, I gained an immeasurable amount of tactical knowledge from my cadre and an equal amount of confidence in my leadership capabilities.

Cadet Jacob Moberly ‘19 makes friends with local children during his CULP trip to Madagascar by demonstrating a good Army pushup.

Cadet Jacob Moberly ’19, at right, children how to do a pushup in Madagascar.
Cadet Jacob Moberly ‘19 makes friends with local children during his CULP trip to Madagascar by demonstrating a good Army pushup.

Cadet Troop Leader Training
By Sydney Thorpe ’18

I was lucky to receive a slot for Cadet Troop Leader Training. I flew to Fort Bragg, North Carolina, to shadow two lieutenants from the 601st Area Support Medical Company. I learned a lot about the medical services branch and participated in company operations. Those included overseeing a change of command inventory of assigned equipment valued at $1.5 million, conducting multiple Army physical fitness tests, qualifying on an M4 rifle, as well as helping to establish a new physical training program that will be implemented in years to come. This experience helped to build my confidence and increase my knowledge of the Army profession in ways that can only be achieved through first-hand experience. I was taught what it takes to be put in charge of junior and senior enlisted soldiers, as well as the collaboration efforts that are carried out with other officers to run an effective company. I am thankful to have been given this experience. It made me realize how excited and ready I am to lead others and become a part of their journey in the service.

Cadet Joe Walker ‘18 and others participated in the grueling Spartan Race with his squad at Advance Camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Cadet Joe Walker ‘18 and three others pose for a picture on the race course.
Cadet Joe Walker ‘18 and others participated in the grueling Spartan Race with his squad at Advance Camp at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Summer Internships
By Spiridon Petropoulos ’19

As a cadet in ROTC, one doesn’t usually get a lot of exposure to other branches of the military. Cadets have a concept of what each branch might do, but not the whole picture. My summer internship with the Advanced Cyber Warfare program, hosted by the Air Force Institute of Technology, was mind-blowing to say the least. I was immersed not only in the cyber realm, but the daily lifestyle of the Air Force. This gave me a great appreciation for how the Air Force serves the United States and what it’s like to be a part of joint operations with another service. Between the classified training sessions, briefs from elite NCOs, and exclusive one-on-one training from professors, I was more than grateful for my attendance. Not only did this internship teach me valuable defensive and offensive cyber-warfare skills, it taught me how to learn and pursue this virtual world with passion and ambition.

 

Culture and Language Deployment
By Liana Sinnott ’18

Over the summer, I was given the opportunity to develop as a leader and gain cultural understanding through my Army ROTC Culture and Language Deployment mission to Thailand. While in country, our main mission was to teach English to Army cadets at the Chulachomklao Royal Military Academy. Although teaching was challenging, it was incredibly rewarding to see so many laughs and smiles from the unique games we created to help make learning more fun. Through exchanges between Thai cadets and officers, I was able to make close friendships and learn more about the country of Thailand. We also spent one week in the rural farmlands of Thailand, learning about their economic system that revolves mainly around the agricultural industry. My team was given the opportunity to work in a rice paddy, as well as build a traditional Thai mud house for a local community. It was humbling to see how hard the people of Thailand worked daily and truly helped motivate me to always give 100 percent in every endeavor that I face. I will never forget my experiences in Thailand and the lifelong friendships that I built with the Thai cadets. This was a once in a lifetime, unique opportunity for leadership development.